Different Title, Different Cover, Same Book

deep poland

You can order the epub here, for a mere 3.45€

Advertisements

Excerpt from the fourth chapter, ‘Deep Poland’

“The departure point in Wroclaw for the mini-busses to Klein-Peterwitz was at a short walk from the main bus station. The bus station was a relic of old times. The new one was under construction at the other side of the road, next to the train station. It already looked like a giant silver-metal Samsonite suitcase laying on its side. It would become more of a shopping mall than a station. As for now the busses waited at a parking space with a number of kiosks grouped around it. They sold pastry and bad coffee to the travellers. There was also a big old German building that looked like an ex-school or an ex-hospital. From here you had to walk over a mud path with on the left-hand side a little garden that lacked tombstones and on the right-hand side a fence. It closed off an area where constructions were going on. The walk lead from poverty to more poverty. A long time ago I might have marvelled at the patina of the socialist era. The mini-busses standing in line, and the people waiting with their luggage made it a depressing site. Boarding the small bus felt like an obligation, or a part of a routine. Travelling was reduced to movement, mostly done after sunset. We couldn’t see where we were, let alone where we went. You could feel from the bumpy road and the turns it made, that we entered Deep Poland.”
You can order the book here

Excerpt from the fourth chapter, ‘Deep Poland’

 
“I visited Poland for the first time in 1991. My girlfriend and I bought a car from a friendly Nigerian guy in Amsterdam. She wanted to see the East. The wall had gone, now we could explore. She had just finished her philosophy studies and my first novel was out since a couple of days. I don’t know if we had the naïve idea to drive to Königsberg. But we did drive a long way, via Wismar and Stralsund where we saw the nearby East German past in a shop that had nothing else than a broom in the window and we saw the nearby future around the corner of that shop, a loud Coca-Cola stand, guy with microphone included. In Kolobrzeg I got depressed in a nightclub full of drunk Scandinavians, who came for cheap beer and cheap sex. I thought to encounter traces of Günter Grass’s books in Gdańsk, but didn’t. I saw Solidarność flags, but somehow they reminded me of the Coca-Cola stand in Stralsund. On we went, Elblag, to the border. It was a simple provincial road with a road block. Soldiers doing their duty sent us back. Was that the former Soviet Union we were looking at? Also at this point we saw the future: a man in a luxury car who wanted to do business at the other side.”
 
 
You can order the book here